https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/issue/feed Journal of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Research 2024-06-05T06:16:31+00:00 Journal of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Research editor@jpadr.com Open Journal Systems <p>The Journal of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Research (JPADR) is the official publication of the Global Pharmacovigilance Society. This is an international, open access, and peer-reviewed scientific journal. It focuses on pharmacovigilance studies and their associated topics such as adverse drug reaction, drug clinical trials, drug effectiveness and efficacy, drugs risk management, as well as all aspects related to the safe use of drugs.</p> <p>The JPADR is oriented to researchers, professors, students, and practitioners from both the pharmaceutical industry sector, as well as the wide range of health and medicine arenas. The journal’s objective is to establish a formal platform for communicating the research results on pharmacovigilance.</p> <p><strong>Aims and Scope</strong></p> <p>The Journal of Pharmacovigilance and Drug Research (JPADR) is the official publication of the Global Pharmacovigilance Society. This is an international, open access, and peer-reviewed scientific journal. It focuses on pharmacovigilance studies and their associated topics such as adverse drug reaction, drug clinical trials, drug effectiveness and efficacy, drugs risk management, as well as all aspects related to the safe use of drugs.</p> <p>Authors can submit manuscripts related to&nbsp;</p> <p>1. Pharmacovigilance</p> <p>2. Materiovigilance/Technovigilance</p> <p>3. Ecopharmacovigilance</p> <p>4. Ayurvedic drugs safety</p> <p>5. Pharmacology</p> <p>6. Computer-aided drug design</p> <p>7. Formulation of pharmaceutical research and development</p> <p>8. Animal Study</p> <p>9. Preclinical trials</p> <p>10. Clinical trials</p> <p>11. Biotechnology</p> <p>12. Pharmacoepidemiology</p> <p>13. Ergonomics</p> <p>14. Newly identified drug</p> <p>15. Haemovigilance</p> <p>16. Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in Pharmaceutical Drug Development</p> <p>The JPADR is oriented to researchers, professors, students, and practitioners from both the pharmaceutical industry sector, as well as the wide range of health and medicine arenas. The journal’s objective is to establish a formal platform for communicating the research results on pharmacovigilance.</p> <p><strong>Ethical code</strong></p> <p>Before submitting an article for possible publication in the journal, we recommend that you read our <a href="https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/Publication-Ethics" target="_blank" rel="noopener">code of ethics for authors</a><strong>.</strong></p> <p><strong>Article Processing Charge (APC)</strong></p> <p>Publication in the JPADR is subject to APC, more information can be found <a href="https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/APC-and-Waiver-Policy" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a><strong>.</strong></p> <p><strong>Publication frequency</strong></p> <p>The journal has a quarterly frequency. Four issues are published a year that cover the periods January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December.</p> <p><strong>Open access statement</strong></p> <p>The JPADR is loyal to open access, allowing any users to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of its articles and to use them for any other lawful purpose. All the articles published in the journal have immediate free access from their publication date. We do not charge any fees for reading or downloading articles.</p> <p><strong>Archiving</strong></p> <p>The published contents in the journal are archived in the <a href="https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/gateway/clockss" target="_blank" rel="noopener">CLOCKSS</a> and <a href="https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/gateway/lockss" target="_blank" rel="noopener">LOCKSS</a> systems.</p> <p><strong>License and copyright </strong></p> <p>Articles in the JPADR are published under the <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">CC BY-NC-ND 4.0</a> License. This allows authors the reproduction of articles, free of charge, for non-commercial use only, and with the appropriate citation information. All authors publishing in the JPADR retain copyright over their work.</p> <p><strong>Society information</strong></p> <p>The <a href="https://globalpvs.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Global Pharmacovigilance Society</a> is composed of a team of pharmacovigilance professionals and leaders across the world aimed to protect patients from any serious adverse event following the administration of any drug. The objective of this society is to improve patient and drug safety. We discuss the strategies to strengthen the pharmacovigilance system. We tend to organize webinars, conferences, and camps to create awareness among the public for adverse drug reactions (ADR) reporting.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/article/view/168 Blockchain: A Perfect Security Check for Medicines 2024-06-01T03:22:22+00:00 Hara Prasad Mishra drharaprasad20@gmail.com Rachna Gupta drrachna1@rediffmail.com <p><strong>Introduction:</strong>&nbsp;Counterfeit medications pose a significant global health threat, resulting in ineffective treatment, adverse reactions, and fatalities, with an estimated 1 million deaths annually worldwide. Despite considerable investments in protective measures, the pharmaceutical industry struggles to curb counterfeiting, with approximately half of fake medications evading prevention measures.</p> <p><strong>Methods:</strong>This review highlights how blockchain technology is helping to guarantee medication authenticity and traceability in the pharmaceutical supply chain. Counterfeit drug detection is made possible by blockchain's decentralised ledger system, which provides an immutable, transparent, and safe platform for recording and verifying transactions.</p> <p><strong>Results:</strong>&nbsp;By leveraging blockchain, stakeholders can create a transparent tracking system for drug validity, enabling better testing, maintaining temperature control, and ensuring pharmaceutical legitimacy.</p> <p><strong>Discussion:</strong>&nbsp;Blockchain technology shows promise in reducing counterfeit drug circulation and improving traceability, as supported by research findings and case studies. However, challenges such as stakeholder agreement, interoperability, implementation costs, security vulnerabilities, and regulatory considerations must be addressed for widespread adoption.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong>&nbsp;Despite challenges, blockchain emerges as a beacon of hope, offering a secure, transparent, and traceable solution to combat drug counterfeiting in the pharmaceutical industry.</p> 2024-06-01T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Hara Prasad Mishra , Rachna Gupta https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/article/view/165 Analysis of price variation & formulation aspects of different brands of cefixime marketed in NCR region 2024-06-01T03:22:22+00:00 Manvi Aggarwal manvi0502@gmail.com Aditya Kaushal manvi0502@gmail.com Saurabh Saraswat manvi0502@gmail.com Ankit Sharma manvi0502@gmail.com <p><strong>Abstract</strong></p> <p>Cefixime tablets are frequently recommended by doctors to cure bacterial infections. Cefixime tablets are commonly prescribed to treat bacterial infections. This antibiotic medication can work either as bacteriostatic or bactericidal. In the NCR region,</p> <p><strong>Aim &amp; Objective</strong></p> <p>To identify the Price Variability Among certain brands of Cefixime available NCR region</p> <p><strong>Methodology </strong></p> <p>Eight different brands of Cefixime tablets opt&nbsp;for&nbsp;quality&nbsp;control testing. Each brand was subjected to various tests, including evaluation for defects, friability, hardness, disintegration, and dissolution. In total, 10 tablets were tested for each brand to ensure their quality.</p> <p><strong>Result</strong></p> <p>Each brand has less than 1% acceptable friability values, except AricefO and Cefilab. Each brand represents hardness values around 8 to 13 N. No defects have been detected in any of the brands. The disintegration and dissolution tests were also tested, performed, and identified.</p> <p><strong>Discussion</strong></p> <p>The quality of medicines must be re-evaluated it is run by the regulatory body responsible for ensuring the safety and effectiveness of medicines people use throughout their shelf life.</p> <p><strong>Keywords</strong>: Dissolution, Disintegration, Friability, Hardness &amp; Defects</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> 2024-06-01T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Manvi Aggarwal https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/article/view/172 Vitamin K1 injection induced localized scleroderma like lesion in pregnancy: A case report 2024-06-05T06:16:31+00:00 Priyanka Banik priyanka.doc001@gmail.com Lopamudra Dhar Chowdury chowdhurykoustuv@gmail.com Koustuv Chowdhury chowdhurykoustuv@gmail.com Abhik Saha pharma.abhik91@gmail.com <p>Cutaneous reaction due to Vitamin K1 (Phytomenadione) injection can present as hypersensitivity reaction at the injection site with morphea like lesion that can be deep &nbsp;seated, involving the dermis &amp; subcutaneous tissue, several days or weeks after &nbsp;injection of vitamin K1. Texier &nbsp;Disease,which is a scleroderma like lesion secondary to &nbsp;vitamin K1 injection is one of the rarely encountered &amp; reported condition.</p> <p>Localised scleroderma is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by fibrosis of the &nbsp;skin and subcutaneous tissues. Although its etiology is not fully understood, several &nbsp;factors including environmental triggers and genetic predisposition have been &nbsp;&nbsp;implicated.</p> 2024-06-01T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Abhik Saha https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/article/view/173 A Case Report on Anti-Microbial Resistance with Cellulitis 2024-06-01T03:22:22+00:00 Prajwal D. S. dsprajwal1999@gmail.com Safiya Anhar safiyaghayas@hotmail.com <p>Introduction:</p> <p>The phenomenon of anti-microbial resistance poses a significant threat to global public health. The widespread and often inappropriate use of antibiotics has led for resistant strains of bacteria and other microbes, leading to concern for effective therapeutic options.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p>Case Report:</p> <p>A 49 years old male presented with the traumatic injury to his left foot by rod resulting in swelling and pain. Examinations revealed penetrating wound with cellulitis. Laboratory investigations with pus sample showed presence of non-fermenting, gram-negative bacilli resistant to a range of antibiotics. The patient was treated with antibiotics like Cefotaxime and Metronidazole, with analgesics like Tramadol and Paracetamol for 5 days, following which he was discharged with a comprehensive follow up plan.<span class="Apple-converted-space">&nbsp;</span></p> <p>Conclusion:</p> <p>This case highlights the growing problem of anti-microbial resistance in wound treatment. Doctors need to tailor a specific treatment plan based on the unique resistance profile of the bacteria. This case emphasizes the importance of improved monitoring for resistant bacteria in hospitals, collaboration between different specialists to tackle such complex wounds, and further research into new treatments to combat this growing threat.</p> 2024-06-01T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Prajwal D S, Safiya Anhar, Safiya Anhar https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/article/view/163 CASE REPORT: Levetiracetam Induced Acute Pancreatitis– An ADR Case Report 2024-06-02T03:31:16+00:00 Dr Shiva Murthy Nanjundappa shivuindia@gmail.com Anjali Venkat anjali.venkat@gmail.com Rohit Krishnappa rohitkrishnappa@yahoo.co.in <p><strong>Introduction:</strong>&nbsp;Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas due to premature activation of pancreatic pro-enzymes, resulting in various degrees of damage. There are various causes of acute pancreatitis, including alcohol poisoning, infections, etc. One of the rarer known causes of acute pancreatitis is an adverse drug reaction due to the anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam.</p> <p><strong>Case report:</strong>&nbsp;A 35-year-old male patient presented to the casualty with complaints of sudden-onset pain in the abdomen that was progressive in intensity, nausea, and vomiting for 1 day. He has been an alcoholic for over 20 years. He has had a similar history—on and off since 3 years—and has been on Tab. Levetiracetam (500mg) for epilepsy for two years. Initial examination revealed a soft abdomen with tenderness in the epigastric region. In this patient, investigations revealed serum amylase of 542 IU/L (the normal reference range is 28–100 IU/L). Raised more than 5 times the normal reference range, and abdominal pain was consistent with pancreatitis.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong>&nbsp;In this article, we discussed various possible causes of acute pancreatitis, with a special focus on levetiracetam induced acute pancreatitis. Further studies are required to understand the etiological factors, epidemiological factors, and outcome of treatment.</p> 2024-06-01T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Dr Shiva Murthy Nanjundappa, Anjali Venkat, Rohit Krishnappa https://jpadr.com/index.php/jpadr/article/view/147 CASE REPORT: Mango Consumption Induced Oral Allergy Syndrome – A Rare Case Report 2024-06-01T03:22:22+00:00 Shadakshari A shadaksharianand1999@gmail.com Karthik V joykarthik03@gmail.com Gurudatta M prashasth.guru@gmail.com Dr Shiva Murthy Nanjundappa shivuindia@gmail.com <p><strong>ABSTRACT </strong></p> <p><strong>Introduction:</strong> Mango, often referred to as the "King of Fruits," is a tropical delight scientifically known as Mangifera indica. Despite its delectable taste and numerous health benefits, it's important to recognise that mangoes can trigger allergic reactions in some individuals. While mango allergies are relatively rare, they can cause discomfort and health concerns for those who are sensitive to certain compounds found in the fruit. In this case report, we discuss a patient who experienced oral allergy syndrome (type I hypersensitivity) after consumption of mango.</p> <p><strong>Case report:</strong> This paper represents the case of a 26-year-old male adult patient who presented with the chief complaint of experiencing 25 episodes of sneezing, an itchy throat, and facial puffiness after consuming mango. The patient had no prior history of allergies or co-morbidities.</p> <p><strong>Conclusion:</strong> The evidence in this case shows mango can be a potential cause for anaphylactic/Type I hypersensitivity reactions, which are rare. Still, more research has to be taken into account to confirm this type of adverse reaction.</p> <p><strong>Key words:</strong> oral allergy syndrome, mango consumption, type I hyper sensitivity to mango.</p> 2024-06-01T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2024 Shadakshari A, Karthik V, Gurudatta M, Dr Shiva Murthy Nanjundappa